April 30, 2019

Birds Hill Provincial Park - Cedar Bog Trail

More than 250 trees have been cut down along the Cedar Bog nature trail upland loop in Birds Hill Provincial Park. By far the largest number of trees removed were bur oaks, along with many aspen some very large and some spruce.

The stumps left have been cleared at or below ground level with a chainsaw. In some cases the trunks cut into four foot sections were still stacked beside the trail.

I found the impact of the removal of these trees heartbreaking. This is a self guided hiking trail though a natural landscape. In some cases, this trail has been widened to more than fifteen feet wide.

The recent trails management plan recently absolutely nothing about widening this trail. Here's the link...
https://www.gov.mb.ca/sd/pubs/parks-protected-spaces/birds_hill_trails_plan.pdf

I am trying to find out why but as yet have had no response from anyone I have reached out to.

Posted on April 30, 2019 00:58 by marykrieger marykrieger | 12 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

September 30, 2018

September 29 - Interlake Pioneer Trail / Inwood Wildlife Management Area (north block)

4 pm to 6:30 pm; 6.58 km (there and back)

identified but not photographed...
Garter Snake
Common Raven
American Robin
Black-capped Chickadee
Pied-Billed Grebe
Blue-winged Teal
Dark-eyed Junco

Trail information from the ATV club that maintains the trail
http://www.siatvclub.com/interlake-pioneer-trail.html

Wildlife Management Areas in Manitoba
http://www.gov.mb.ca/sd/wildlife/habcons/wmas/gMap/index.html

All my observations on that day
https://www.inaturalist.org/calendar/marykrieger/2018/9/29

Posted on September 30, 2018 13:03 by marykrieger marykrieger | 11 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

August 28, 2018

Why did I post such a poor out-of focus picture?

Those who view my observations will sometimes find one with an image that is incredibly poor. This can be disconcerting, especially for those who wish to use their identification skills to help me out. Here is how I decide to post them.

I always use the best image I have of an organism for the observation. You can depend on that being the very best image that i could capture that day of that species in that area.

If I have seen the organism before in that habitat, I hold myself to a higher quality of image. I should feel that there is a reasonable chance of identifying the organism using characteristics visible to an observer in the image.

The really really bad images are of organisms novel to me where those are the only image(s) I have of them.

Now the why :)

Organism identification methods make assumptions over the access that the identifier has to the organism. For some groups of organisms, identifying from a photograph can be near impossible using current keys. For others, careful photography can reveal the field marks needed for a secure identification.

An observer who has clocked many hours of experience with a specific organism can recognize a species or subspecies instantly while many of us are still struggling to decide where to start.

iNaturalist has added a third type of identification - computer vision - specifically Fine-Grained Visual Categorization (FGVC). And this is the real reason I add these poor photos.

To be useful to this identification, the image does not have to be in focus but it does have to be exclusively of the organism. If there are enough observations of the organism that have been identified by human observers, an algorithm can identify this type of poor image.

Right now, we aren't there yet for most organisms. As the database grows and the number of research observations increase, this type of identification will become more and more useful.

While I am waiting for that to happen, sometimes I get lucky and even the crappiest photo gets an id from an experienced observer. (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/14361398) In any case, I have a reminder to watch out for a better photograph the next time I see that particular elusive subject. :)

Posted on August 28, 2018 12:44 by marykrieger marykrieger | 1 observations | 2 comments | Leave a comment

August 24, 2017

Manitoba strawberries (vesca or virginiana)

Two species of wild strawberry are reported as found in Manitoba by the Manitoba Conservation Data Center (http://www.gov.mb.ca/sd/cdc/pdf/plant_rank.pdf)

Fragaria vesca Woodland Strawberry

Fragaria virginiana Smooth Wild Strawberry

I have long wondered how to tell them apart easily when the fruit is not present. donaldasutherland left an excellent tip on one of my observations "Terminal tooth of leaflet shorter than adjacent two." indicating F. virginiana. Using this character, I went back through my observations so far and had another go at id. In many of the photos, the terminal tooth characteristic was easily visible--though not all :(.

I have attached my observations now suspected to be/identified as F. virginiana and those suspected to be/identified as F. vesca. Looking at them as a whole, I can see the group now tagged as F. virginiana live up to their common name of Smooth. The ones now tagged as F. vesca tend to be shaggier in appearance. I also see that I have taken a lot more photographs of F. virginiana.

Budd's Flora of the Prairie Provinces indicates F. virginiana is found in prairie, open woodland and moist areas throughout. F. vesca is found in rocky woodlands, Boreal Forest. Scoggan's Flora of Manitoba describes F. virginiana as found in thickets, prairie, rock outcrops, and clearings in the southern two-thirds of Manitoba while F. vesca is found in thickets, woods and clearings in the southern three-fifths.

This seems to me to imply that on many of my outings, I will encounter habitats appropriate for both species. My habit of only recording the first individual that I identify might be obscuring that both species are present in a specific area - though preferring separate micro habitats. Hopefully the shaggy impression plus the terminal tooth characteristic will help me to catch any F. vesca that I previously might have overlooked.

I will also make sure that I get the ends of at least one terminal leaflet in sharp focus :)

PS here's the full set used in Scoggan, Flora of Manitoba: F. vesca Terminal tooth of leaflet mostly longer than adjacent two, leaflets are subsessile, calyx lobes spreading or reflexed on fruit, seeds on surface of fruit; F. virginiana Terminal tooth of leaflet mostly shorter than adjacent two, leaflets on short petioles, calyx lobes ascend around young fruit, seeds in pits on surface of fruit (Scoggan, Flora of Manitoba) ;;

Posted on August 24, 2017 12:47 by marykrieger marykrieger | 13 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

August 22, 2017

Online Identification resources

Mosses and Liverworts
Consortium of North American Bryophyte Herbaria (CNABH) http://bryophyteportal.org/portal/

Lichens
Consortium of North American Lichen Herbaria (CNALH) http://lichenportal.org/portal/
Field Guide to Cladonia http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/pdf/Pub92_Cladonia_field-guide_PRINT.pdf

Mushrooms
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/

Arthropods
BugGuide Insects, Spiders and their kin http://bugguide.net/node/
Common Insect and Mite Galls of the Canadian Prairies http://www.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/bookstore_pdfs/12155.pdf

Vascular Plants
E-Flora: Flora of North America http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1

New England Wildflowers https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/

Identification of common riparian plants of Saskatchewan http://www1.foragebeef.ca/$Foragebeef/frgebeef.nsf/all/frg96/$FILE/riparianplantIDSk.pdf

Manitoba Conservation Data Centre http://www.gov.mb.ca/sd/cdc/db.html

Plants of Riding Mountain National Park http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/aac-aafc/agrhist/A53-1818-1988-eng.pdf

All Life
Canadensys - Biological collections http://data.canadensys.net/explorer/en/search
Trees, insects and diseases of Canada's forests https://tidcf.nrcan.gc.ca/en/home

ITIS, the Integrated Taxonomic Information System https://www.itis.gov/

Posted on August 22, 2017 22:11 by marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comments | Leave a comment

July 13, 2017

Manitoba-related Guides

All Manitoba

Butterflies of Manitoba
This is a list of butterfly species that regularly occur in Manitoba. Compiled by the Manitoba Conservation Data Centre. www.manitoba.ca/sd/cdc
Edited by manitoba_cdc

Amphibians and Reptiles of Manitoba
Edited by skinklab

Riding Mountain National Park

Animals of Riding Mountain National Park | Les animaux du parc national du Mont-Riding
A guide to animal species observed in Riding Mountain National Park of Canada. For more information about Riding Mountain National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/riding/index.aspx Un guide des espèces animales observées dans le parc national du Canada du Mont-Riding. Pour...
Edited by parkscanada, alanaplummer, and parksguy

Plants of Riding Mountain National Park (Guide 2) | Les plantes du parc national du Mont-Riding (guide 2)
A guide to trees and grasses observed in Riding Mountain National Park of Canada. For more information about Riding Mountain National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/riding/index.aspx Un guide des espèces d'arbres et des espèces d'herbes observées dans le parc national du ...
Edited by parkscanada

Plants of Riding Mountain National Park (Guide 3) | Les plantes du parc national du Mont-Riding (guide 3)
A guide to flowering plant species observed in Riding Mountain National Park of Canada. For more information about Riding Mountain National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/riding/index.aspx Un guide des espèces floristiques observées dans le parc national du Canada du Mont...
Edited by parkscanada

Wapusk National Park

Vascular Plants of Wapusk National Park | Les plantes vasculaires du parc national Wapusk
A guide to vascular plant species observed in Wapusk National Park of Canada. For more information about Wapusk National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/wapusk/index.aspx Un guide des espèces de plantes vasculaires observées dans le parc national du Canada Wapusk. Pour en ...
Edited by parkscanada

Mosses & Liverworts of Wapusk National Park | Les mousses et les hépatiques du parc national Wapusk
A guide to moss species and liverwort species observed in Wapusk National Park of Canada. For more information about Wapusk National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/wapusk/index.aspx Un guide des espèces de mousses et des espèces de hépatiques observées dans le parc nation...
Edited by parkscanada

Lichens & Fungi of Wapusk National Park | Les lichens et les champignons du parc national Wapusk
A guide to lichen species and fungus species observed in Wapusk National Park of Canada. For more information about Wapusk National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/wapusk/index.aspx Un guide des espèces de lichen et des espèces de champignons observées dans le parc nationa...
Edited by parkscanada

Animals of Wapusk National Park | Les animaux du parc national Wapusk
A guide to animal species observed in Wapusk National Park of Canada. For more information about Wapusk National Park, please visit: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/mb/wapusk/index.aspx Un guide des espèces animales observées dans le parc national du Canada Wapusk. Pour en savoir plus sur le par...
Edited by parkscanada, alanaplummer, and parksguy

Posted on July 13, 2017 02:13 by marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 24, 2017

Manitoba parks and protected areas listed as iNaturalist Places

In Selkirk

https://www.inaturalist.org/places/little-lake-park
https://www.inaturalist.org/places/selkirk-park
In Winnipeg

Assiniboine Forest
https://www.inaturalist.org/places/the-forks
FortWhyte Alive
Living Prairie Museum
https://www.inaturalist.org/places/memorial-provincial-park

elsewhere in Manitoba
Asessippi Provincial Park

Bakers Narrows Provincial Park

Beaudry Provincial Park

Beaver Creek Provincial Park

Birds Hill Provincial Park

Caribou River Provincial Wilderness Park

Chitek Lake Anishinaabe Provincial Park

Hyland Provincial Park

Kinwow Bay Provincial Park

Narcisse Wildlife Management Area

Mars Hill WMA

Neso Lake Provincial Park

Oak Hammock Marsh

Pinawa Dam Provincial Heritage Park

Portage Spillway Provincial Park

Riding Mountain National Park

St. Norbert Provincial Park

Stephenfield Provincial Park

Thalberg Bush WMA

Turtle Mountain Provincial Park

Twin Lakes Provincial Park

Wekusko Falls Provincial Park

Whitefish Lake Provincial Park

Whitemouth Falls Provincial Park

Whiteshell Provincial Park

Yellow Quill Provincial Park

to be added
Burge Lake Provincial Park
Colvin Lake Provincial Park
Nueltin Lake Provincial Park
Numaykoos Lake Provincial Wilderness Park
Paint Lake Provincial Park
Pisew Falls Provincial Park
Sand Lakes Provincial Wilderness Park
Zed Lake Provincial Park
Clearwater Lake Provincial Park
Grass River Provincial Park
Atikaki Provincial Wilderness Park
Birch Point Provincial Park
Manigotagan River Provincial Park
Marchand Provincial Park
Moose Lake Provincial Park
Nopiming Provincial Park
Pinawa Provincial Park
Poplar Bay Provincial Park
South Atikaki
St. Malo Provincial Park
Wallace Lake
Manitoba-Ontario Interprovincial Wilderness Area
Woodridge Provincial Park
Camp Morton Provincial Park
Duff Roblin Provincial Park
Elk Island Provincial Park
Grand Beach Provincial Park
Hecla / Grindstone Provincial Park
Hnausa Beach Provincial Park
Lake St. George Provincial Park
Lockport Provincial Heritage Park
Lundar Beach Provincial Park
Norris Lake Provincial Park
Patricia Beach Provincial Park
Pembina Valley Provincial Park
River Road Provincial Heritage Park
St. Ambroise Beach Provincial Park
Trappist Monastery Provincial Heritage Park
Watchorn Provincial Park
Winnipeg Beach Provincial Park
Bell Lake Provincial Park
Criddle / Vane Homestead Provincial Park
Duck Mountain Provincial Park
Kettle Stones Provincial Park
Manipogo Provincial Park
North Steeprock Lake Provincial Park
Rainbow Beach Provincial Park
Rivers Provincial Park
Spruce Woods Provincial Park
William Lake Provincial Park

plus WMAs and Ecological reserves

Posted on June 24, 2017 14:25 by marykrieger marykrieger | 0 comments | Leave a comment