Saving our Black Cockatoos Southwest Australia's Journal

January 04, 2023

Black Cockatoo Crisis

Black Cockatoo Crisis

Western Australia’s three species of south west black cockatoo are in trouble. Unless we change the way we manage their habitat we will lose these unique birds to extinction in less than 20 years.

https://www.blackcockatoocrisis.com.au/

Posted on January 04, 2023 12:41 PM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 1 comment | Leave a comment

The CockyWatch road survey

The CockyWatch road survey

CockyWatch road surveys are a citizen science initiative that will help us find out more about the black-cockatoos of the South West. These birds are threatened at both a state and national level, but there are no robust estimates of their population size – a real problem for cockatoo researchers – but with CockyWatch, you can help expand our knowledge about these charismatic birds.

https://birdlife.org.au/events/cockywatch/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=BirdLife%20WA%20eNews%20%204%20January%202023&utm_content=BirdLife%20WA%20eNews%20%204%20January%202023+CID_07dfe20da9cfffc8a8d48e7c5e23d6c1&utm_source=Email%20marketing%20software&utm_term=BirdLifes%20CockyWatch%20surveys

Posted on January 04, 2023 12:39 PM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

December 14, 2022

URGENT please comment re Gnangara pine plantation & Carnaby's black cockatoos by Monday 19th December 5pm

Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos (Ngolyenok) are a Western Australian icon. These incredible birds were once so prevalent that flocks could black out the skies of Perth as they migrated from their coastal habitat out to the Wheatbelt in search of ancient Eucalypts to nest in.

But, over the last decade, their population has plummeted by nearly 40% due to the destruction of their feeding habitat in the Perth-Peel Coastal Plain. Now these iconic cockies are listed as Endangered and are on a path to extinction if we continue with business as usual.

Can you take action to protect one of their few remaining strong holds?

Read our Supporter Guide for tips on how to
add your comments at the WA EPA website
From today, the WA Environmental Protection Authority is receiving public comments on a governmental plan that could permanently destroy vital feeding habitat for Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos in the Gnangara pine plantations, just north of Perth.

After the removal of two thirds of Perth’s Banksia woodlands Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos changed their diets and now heavily rely on the pine plantations for food and roost sites.

Results from recent Great Cocky Count surveys have found that up to 70% of all Carnaby's in the Perth-Peel Coastal Plain are concentrated in the Gnangara pine plantation.

The WA Government’s plan would escalate the clearing of the Gnangara pine plantation without considering the impacts on Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos.

Can you use our handy guide below to add your comments and let the WA EPA know feeding habitat for Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos must be protected?

Comments are due by Monday the 19th December at 5:00PM and its important that the WA EPA hears from as many people as possible so they know that the public is concerned about this issue.

Together we can make a difference for our birds,
Merryn Pryor
WA Black-Cockatoo Project Officer

Gnangara Pines Supporter Guide, with photo: Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo by Nathan Watson
How to make a submission:

Visit the WA EPA comment survey.
Add your name, contact email, organisation you represent (if relevant, you can put personal otherwise) and postal address.
Indicate that your preferred option for decision by the EPA is: Assess – Public environmental review.
Add a few comments about why you care about this issue and why you think the EPA must assess the plan (see suggestions below).
Indicate in your comments that there must be an immediate moratorium on pine harvesting until a final decision is made.
Indicate if you would like to be notified when the final amendment is approved.
Submit your comments.
Suggested Comments you could make:

The destruction of the Gnangara pine plantations would have a significant impact on Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos (Ngolyenoks) because:
The population in the Perth-Peel region has already declined 35% in a ten-year period.
Over two thirds of their banksia woodland feeding habitat has been cleared.
The Gnangara pines hold up to 70% of the Perth-Peel population in the non-breeding season and is an important roosting and feeding habitat.
The Gnangara pines hold up to 70% of the Perth-Peel population in the non-breeding season and is an important roosting and feeding habitat.
Studies show that the destruction of the Gnangara pines would result in an additional reduction of the Perth-Peel population by 56%.
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos (Ngolyenoks) are nationally-listed as Endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.
The Federal Government’s recently released 2022-2032 Threatened Species Action Plan lists Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos (Ngolyenoks) as one of 22 priority bird species where efforts will be focused to reduce the risk of their extinction.
Previous Forest Management Plans failed to assess the impact of the destruction of pine feeding habitat on Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos.
The Strategic Assessment of the Perth and Peel Regions has been deferred indefinitely and thus the destruction of the pine feeding habitat will not be formally assessed through that process.
A formal assessment would ensure proper accountability of the State government for the impact of the destruction of pine feeding habitat on Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos (Ngolyenoks).
A formal assessment would allow public participation in decision-making. This is important because of the failure of previous Forest Management Plans to address the impact and the failure of the Strategic Assessment of the Perth and Peel Regions to reach an outcome, despite being commenced in 2011.
There must be an immediate cessation of harvesting of pine in the Gnangara plantations while a thorough assessment is conducted. Destruction of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo (Ngolyenok) feeding habitat must stop now or they risk starvation.

Visit the WA EPA website
to add your comments

https://go.birdlife.org.au/webmail/946822/969646872/ad5d77e1cb97e31031bc233bb7876b44feed8915d266d53b5c1b609990ff2c12

Posted on December 14, 2022 11:33 AM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

September 22, 2022

July 24, 2022

Baudin's Black Cockatoos CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

It's official, Baudin's Black Cockatoos are now listed in the IUCN Red List as CRITICALLY ENDANGERED.

https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22684727/210840935

Posted on July 24, 2022 11:06 AM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

May 03, 2022

A Thousand Cuts - Report

An extremely interesting read highlighting the dire plight of the 3 endangered black cockatoos and their habitat which is at increased threat of being destroyed by mining. In fact, mining is the No1 threat to destruction of their habitat.

WA’s peak environment and forest conservation groups have published this report to provide information and analysis regarding the impacts of bauxite mining in the Northern Jarrah Forests. The Northern Jarrah Forests are one of a handful of Australian ecosystems under particular threat of collapse due to climate change. They are highly diverse and home to an incredible number and variety of plants and animals as well as being vital to water quality and supply for the Perth metropolitan region and South West forests.
West Australians are increasingly concerned with the protection of this magnificent place. The report provides both an overview and high level of detail on the region and the threat posed by proposed mining expansions.
It will assist in advocacy, research and communication as we work towards the protection of the Northern
Jarrah Forests in secure conservation areas.

https://wafa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/A-Thousand-Cuts-NJF-Report-FINAL.pdf?utm_source=Website&utm_medium=pdf&utm_campaign=NJF&fbclid=IwAR182QnCFZOiK3GHbmmiFKCl8k7sd8nZoaDlxDaagx-owUvyTyYavrDezUA

Posted on May 03, 2022 11:22 AM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 17, 2022

Carnaby's breaks record

Carnaby’s breaks record

The Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo of Western Australia is a migratory species, undertaking regular seasonal movements each year, heading from drier inland areas of the state towards the coast as the cooler weather sets in.

Although the timing of these movements is reasonably predictable, the distance that these birds fly is less so, with most birds flying no further than 150 kilometres or so between breeding grounds and their near-coastal wintering areas. Indeed, according to the ABBBS database, the longest-recorded distance ever flown by a Carnaby’s was 169 kilometres, between the grounds of Murdoch University in Perth and Boyanup State Forest, in the state’s far south.

However, a keen observer recently saw (and photographed) a Carnaby’s on a farming property in the Chapman Valley, in the state’s Midwest. The bird had previously been fitted with an individual metal band on its leg, and by closely examining the photographs taken of the bird, it was possible to make out the individual numbers engraved on the leg-band, and thus determine the identity of the cocky. It didn’t take too much more investigation to discover that the bird was far from Coomallo, north of Perth, where it had been banded — 200 kilometres away! A new world record!

If you'd like to contribute to Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo conservation, why not register to take part in this year's Great Cocky Count, to take place on Sunday 3 April. Registrations close on 13 March.

That's not all we're doing to save Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos. BirdLife Australia has joined with other organisations to mount a campaign to protect Carnaby's and other threatened black-cockatoos in Western Australia.

Western Australia’s peak environmental groups, scientists, doctors and Indigenous Elders have launched a campaign to ‘Save The Black Cockatoos’ with a petition handover to the Minister for Environment Reece Whitby and Labor MLC Stephen Pratt at Parliament House, which took place on Tuesday 22-2-22. Stephen Pratt agreed to submit the petition to the Upper House.

Unfortunately, an accompanying rally that had been planned for the day had to be cancelled due to COVID 19.

Birdlife Australia, The WA Forest Alliance, The Conservation Council of WA, The Wilderness Society and the Urban Bushland Council are calling for an investigation into why current ‘Recovery Plans’ are not being instigated, leading to a massive loss of habitat and drop in numbers of black-cockatoos.

So degraded and reduced is the natural habitat of the black-cockatoos, they have moved into plantations to find sufficient food to survive. Birdlife Australia’s Black-Cockatoo Recovery Manager, Rochelle Steven, said that hundreds of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos currently obtain half of their food from the Gnangara pine plantation, but despite their reliance on this food source, the last few thousand hectares of pines in the plantation are due to be chopped down over the next 2 years — without being replaced with banksia woodland, or any other alternative food source.

“Removing this food supply could result in a massive starvation event,” she said.

https://birdlife.org.au/media/carnabys-breaks-record/

Posted on March 17, 2022 05:42 AM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 14, 2022

February 17, 2022

February 01, 2022

Rally to Save The Black Cockatoos at Parliament House Perth Tuesday 22nd February 2022 at 12 noon

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/rally-to-save-the-black-cockatoos-tickets-251834161757?utm_source=Website&utm_campaign=Cockies&fbclid=IwAR1sL16jlCKU8et7BaHzJgOD-9ixmVKgbtDI4p3exXDDQUOWxMIoFcLCkv8

Rally to #SaveTheBlackCockatoos and their woodland and forest habitat. This is a campaign launch and petition handover. Wear black.
About this event
WA’s leading conservation groups together with scientists and Aboriginal elders have formed a coalition to call for an emergency plan to #SaveTheBlackCockatoos of the Southwest of WA from extinction. This event will launch the campaign and involve a petition hand-over. Wear black to show support.

All three threatened species of black cockatoo have fallen drastically in number and face a high risk of becoming extinct without strong action to protect and expand their habitat.

• The Ngolyenok (Carnaby’s Cockatoo)

• The Ngolak (Baudin’s Cockatoo) and

• The Karak (Forest Red-tailed Cockatoo)

Much of their woodlands and forests have been cleared and what remains is fragmented and much altered by logging (which will stop by 2024) as well as thinning, mining, clearing, drying from climate change and inappropriate fire management practices. This has resulted in the depletion of both their food supply and the old trees with large hollows that they need for breeding.

The lack of food has forced many to rely on gardens, orchards, and plantations.

Ngolak’s are being illegally shot in pear and apple orchards while the northern population of Ngolyenoks are reliant on the Gnangara pine plantation for half their food, which is being chopped down over the next 2 years. Removing the last of this food supply could result in a massive starvation event. Meanwhile Karaks face proposals to expand bauxite mining in the Jarrah Forest by 50%. All species are also affected by land clearing and inappropriate fire regimes.

Recovery plans for these species have previously been created but the recommendations have not been instigated. We have therefore launched a petition to investigate this failure and calling for an emergency plan co-designed and managed with Traditional Owners and scientists that includes the following actions to address their major threats.

  1. Set targets to expand forests and woodlands.
  2. Stop the expansion of bauxite mining in native forests.
  3. Undertake a scientific review of broad scale prescribed burning.
  4. Stop the Illegal shooting of Black Cockatoo in Orchards.
  5. Save the Banksia Woodlands on the coastal plain and the Woodlands of the wheatbelt.
  6. Stop the clearing the Gnangara pine plantation until the Banksia Woodland is restored.
  7. Encouraging the public and local governments to plant Black Cockatoo food trees.

Please come to the Rally on 22-2-22 and bring a friend or 2 and wear black to show your support.

Posted on February 01, 2022 05:32 AM by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment